Reuse treated waste water solves water crisis

With a growing population, the per capita availability of water has dropped from 1,816 cubic meters in 2001 to 1,545 cubic meters in 2011. Only 70 percent of urban households have access to piped water supply.

Water stress has become a perennial concern in most Indian cities. India is expected to add approximately 404 million new urban dwellers between 2015 and 2050. Ranen Banerjee, Partner and Leader Public Sector and Governance, PwC said, “The wastewater sector will be driven by government initiatives based on which the implementation models will be designed. Hence, sound policy and regulatory interventions by the central and state governments are a prerequisite for the launching of innovative reuse projects. Government interventions will need to focus on incentivizing the use of reclaimed water and developing institutional support mechanisms.”

Reuse of treated wastewater is getting strong support from government policy. It is an important element in the ambitious plan to clean up the River Ganga, a flagship initiative of the ruling government (Clean Ganga Mission), and is also included in other urban policies and their related funding streams. By signing the Paris Agreement on climate change in April 2016, India has signaled its concern for the sustainable use of natural resources. Water reuse fits well with these broader environmental goals, helping, as it does, to conserve scarce resources and to promote efficient use.

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